Read Recent Journals
Reply To:
Entered By: Matt Zell
Entry Date: 2008-04-21 12:46:49
Subject: re: A bit personal
Message:
 

Paula, I can relate to your thoughts of inadequacy in homeschooling.  My wife and I (mostly my wife) homeschooled our two kids through highschool.  We never did feel adequate and it has nothing to do with education.  It's a desire to see the best and do the best and that's a tough target to hit. The National Association for Education did homeschoolers a great favor by conducting a study to examine the relationship between the education level of the parents and the academic success of the children.  They found that for students in public or private school there is a definate correlation between the parents education (or lack thereof) and their children's 'ability'.  For homeschoolers it was a totally different story.  First, the homeschoolers performed better accross the board.  Second, the lack of the mother's college education or even high school diploma was not statistically significant factor - the kids did the same.  So, women who did not complete high school were able to have children performing at the upper levels academically of our nation.  I believe that trust in the Lord, with work and desire make up for the any educational lacking.   Also, as we homeschooled are primary target was to bring up our children in the knowledge, love and fear of the Lord, then to grow in character and as a family, and lastly was to achieve academically.  The Lord really seemed to bless the desire of our hearts and we thank Him for our homeschool success. You feel inadequate.  I say that's good because you want more for the kids.  It is work!  Ps 127: 1, "Unless the Lord builds the house, its builders labor in vain.  Unless the Lord watches over the city, the watchmen stand guard in vain."  Seems funny that the Lord is building is the house and the workmen still have to... work! May the Lord bless your efforts and may He be glorified!  Matt
Replies to this message
re: A bit personal  by Paula on Monday April 21, 2008




Read Recent Journals

See other journal entries

710